TRF man sentenced for possessing child porn
TRF man sentenced for possessing child porn
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A Thief River Falls man was sentenced Monday, March 22 in Pennington County District Court for possessing five photos of child pornography in 2019.

Jonathan Wyatt Hulst, 19, was sentenced to five felony counts of possession of pornographic work involving minors, according to online court records.

For one felony offense, Hulst was ordered to serve 18 months in prison stayed for 10 years. He was ordered to pay $210 in fees and fines. For the second offense, Hulst was ordered to serve 27 months in prison stayed for 10 years. For a third offense, he was ordered to serve 36 months in prison stayed for 10 years. For the fourth offense, he was ordered to serve 45 months in prison stayed for 10 years. For the fifth offense, he was ordered to serve 70 months in prison stayed for 10 years. Those sentences are to be served concurrently with one another.

The same conditions apply for each offense, including serving 90 days in jail. He was given credit for five days served. Among other things, work release and Sentence to Serve privileges were granted. Conditional release after confinement was set at five years.

He was ordered to serve supervised probation for 10 years. Hulst was ordered to have no contact with anyone – male or female – under the age of 18 unless he receives permission from his agent. His brothers are excluded from that provision.

Hulst was ordered to undergo a psychological-sexual evaluation, including submitting to a polygraph exam as part of the treatment process and paying for the polygraph. Hulst was ordered to not use or possess firearms, ammunition, or explosives. Hulst was also ordered to pay a $50 fine for each of the four latter offenses.

The charges stemmed from the December 2019 report from the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

According to the complaint, the Thief River Falls police investigator learned that Twitter had earlier reported a series of pornographic images of children to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

The complaint indicated that law enforcement in Denmark, Iowa, and Washington identified some of the images involving child victims. One of the Internet Provider addresses accessing some of the photos belonged to Hulst.

Law enforcement later executed a search warrant at Hulst’s home. His email account, named after his dog, was also associated with the account. The investigator confiscated Hulst’s phone. She observed two images that featured a penis, dildo, or other object being inserted into a child’s vagina. One of those two images depicted a tied-up infant female while the other depicted a “young female.”

A third image depicted a “minor female” touching her exposed body. A fourth image seemingly depicted the aftermath of oral sex with a “young female” while a fifth image depicted a liquid substance near a minor female’s genitalia. Hulst, then a student at Lincoln High School, spoke to the investigator at LHS while in the presence of his mom as well as a school counselor, the principal, and a Pine to Prairie Drug Task Force officer.

He said he had a problem with pornography when he was younger, but he felt that he had the problem “under pretty good control.” Hulst said he clicked on links that led him to several pornographic images. Hulst said he believed some of the images were of young girls, but he thought the images were of young teenagers. He said he was disturbed by some of the images, but he didn’t think any of the images involved a child under the age of 5.

Hulst indicated the photos bothered him “for some time” and he felt bad not telling anyone about the photos. The complaint indicated that Hulst said he had clicked on a link, asking him to trade.

He told the investigator that he didn’t know what the people wanted to trade. However, Hulst knew an abbreviation apparently used in child pornography circles. When told one of the images was of a child under the age of 5, Hulst became “really upset” and said he hoped law enforcement wouldn’t look at him differently.